Last summer, I rented a motorcycle in Las Vegas, Nevada.  I had a fun road trip with smooth cruising and open country with stops in Phoenix, Arizona and Albuquerque, New Mexico.  As I traveled back west into California I was reminded of why my visits to the Golden State are often fairly brief.

California has awful traffic from lane to lane.

Not that I didn’t know traffic would suck, I was just impressed by the central roll it played in the lives of all Californians.  My friend that I stayed with near Torrance beach didn’t leave his house until it was past traffic time, we even “risked it” by cruising down to the beach during lunch hour.

At a social event that weekend our host was delayed by 2  1/2 hours because of “traffic,” but it seemed like it was a pretty common and unconcerned situation.  There are many prime examples, but it seems like traffic plays a constantly deterring roll in peoples lives.    And as such traffic played a daily roll in how each Californian lived their lives.

So I got to thinking — wouldn’t you figure in the middle of traffic near Inglewood — besides the obviously large population here, why is traffic so harsh?  Because traffic has become the true price Californians for paying for the socialism they voted for.  And what a heavy price and burden it is becoming.

Californians already pay the most taxes of any state in nearly every major form.  For example, gas taxes, sales, income taxes, toll roads, parking taxes, water, the list goes on.  Regulations are skyrocketing for anyone who owns a small business or property.  As a result you find some of the highest average rent prices in areas from San Francisco to Los Angeles.  But to the average voter it seems like political values are somehow not to blame.

So here I see a clear picture of the implicit and explicit costs of a shoddy attempt at a socialist revolution in California.  The REAL and USEFUL (and there are few) uses of government here puts socialism first thus eroding productive and constructive functions of tax payer revenue (and in California, it’s a massive amount).

When government officials have no incentive to creating a functioning transit system, the money goes wasted to contractors more worried about lining their own pockets.  In reality this perverse relationship with government officials, frequently liberal leaning, creates an environment where inefficiency and waste become the norm.  Now in major urban areas, not just California but nation wide, we waste our time in traffic jams and people don’t seem to ask why?

Sure, it’s worth living in debt and servitude right?  They’re just too large of a state with too many people of different backgrounds right?  I disagree.  Let’s reintroduce policies that promote freedom, liberty, and personal responsibility even if California seems to be too far gone.  That’s why I am proud of groups like Turning Point USA  and others who stand up for free-speech and free markets in these liberal hot beds of academia in places like California.  We can do better.

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